Julia Wakefield

The home page of Julia Wakefield, an independent artist that specialises in illustration and printmaking. Online gallery, recent news and purchase links.

Days 8,9,10,11,12 and 13!

I’m actually two days behind in this project but I’m not going to rush it – will just have to catch up at some stage.

The starfish was done entirely in Photoshop: it really has very long arms but I love the pattern on its body. The background is supposed to be the glowing coral.

Starfish close-up, digital image

Starfish close-up, digital image

If you think Day 9 looks like something out of a children’s story or a science fiction movie, that’s exactly how it appeared to me. These shrimps with attitude have a symbiotic relationship with sea urchins – and as you can see they are advancing greedily on the poisonous baby tentacles, which have no harmful effect on them.

Shrimps with Attitude, watercolour

Shrimps with Attitude, watercolour

Day 10 is the Harlequin Sweetlips, also known as the Clown or the Manyspotted Sweetlips. Do not confuse with the clown fish (Nemo) or the Harlequin Tuskfish (that’s the next one I’m doing). These two are possibly mother and daughter, father and son or mother and son or even father and daughter – the juveniles transform into very different adults.

Harlequin Sweetlips, adult and child

Harlequin Sweetlips, adult and child

I had great fun with this one. It’s a harlequin tuskfish swimming amongst a coral spawning. It started as a monoprint, then got transformed in Photoshop. This is the digital image and I won’t do any more to it. I haven’t printed it on watercolour paper yet but I intend to.

Harlequin Tuskfish, monoprint and digital image

Harlequin tTuskfish, monoprint and digital image

Well this is day 12 but I should be on day 14 by now! This creature, the Mimic Octopus, is a shape shifter extraordinaire. And it’s possibly the most intelligent marine creature in the world. In this picture it’s simply using its camouflage to blend into the background, but it can also imitate sea snakes, flounders, jellyfish and marine plants – as well as a host of other things.

a pair of Mimic Octopi, watercolour

a pair of Mimic Octopi, watercolour

This is what I want to do when I go to the Great Barrier Reef.  Unlike its cousin the stingray, manta rays don’t contain a barb, and have the largest brain to body ratio of any Elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).  And despite its enormous size, it’s harmless to humans – that huge mouth eats plankton and fish larvae.

Manta rays and me

Manta rays and me

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